Serious Questions (NaPoWriMo Day 14)

To George from Biff

Where does wind come from?
Where does it go?
How far does rain fall?
Would it rather be snow?

If sunlight could sleep,
would it dream of the night?
If moonlight could sing,
would its rhythm be tight?

Do flowers get happy
when it’s time to bloom?
And when it’s all over,
do they fall into gloom?

Do trees feel the pain
of leaves bursting forth?
Does Polaris realize
it helps point us north?

I don’t have those answers
but this one I do,
when asked who’s my true love
I always say you!
***

Almost caught up…yesterday’s poem used the NaPoWriMo.net prompt: write a poem entirely of questions, except the last line.

Apparently I get rhyme-y when I am pressed for time.

Shoes in the airport and other observations

espadrilles, slingbacks, Birkenstocks, heels

flip-flops thwapping, wedges clapping

thick rubber soles for those always standing

slip-ons to slide through security

 

neon yellow sneakers

preppie red topsiders

denim blue nubucks

green Nikes, green shirt, green hair

 

lace-up boots and a beret

cowboy boots and a mini

calf-high boots and a scarf

army boots and a mission

 

strollers with little feet dangling

strawberry ankle-strap sandals

tiger-face rollerbag

floppy grimy duck

 

flight attendant’s skirt so tight her pockets gape

lumpy teen’s shorts so short her undies show

obese woman’s wheelchair braced like a baggage cart

mama’s tight pants with a belly bulging out

 

mirrored sunglasses slung backward from the ears

uniforms of khakis and polos and backpacks

Bluetooth headset, Blackberry clipped to the belt

hard-soled, long-toed, Italian leather loafers

 

(click, click, click)

 

all of us pieces of ego and oddness

and still somebody claims us

***

Harry Burns: You take someone to the airport, it’s clearly the beginning of the relationship. That’s why I have never taken anyone to the airport at the beginning of a relationship.
Sally Albright: Why?
Harry Burns: Because eventually things move on and you don’t take someone to the airport and I never wanted anyone to say to me, How come you never take me to the airport anymore?
Sally Albright: It’s amazing. You look like a normal person, but actually you are the angel of death. (When Harry Met Sally)

Rima XXXVIII (translation) – G. A. Bécquer

Sighs are air and go to air!

Tears are water and go to the sea!

Tell me, woman, when love is forgotten,

do you know where it goes?

***

Los suspiros son aire y van al aire.

Las lágrimas son agua y van al mar.

Dime, mujer, cuando el amor se olvida,

¿sabes tú adónde va?

***

The original Spanish is the beautiful work of Gustavo Adolpho Bécquer. Any errors in translation are entirely my own.

Rima XXIII (translation) – G. A. Bécquer

For a glance, a world;

for a smile, a heaven;

for a kiss…I do not know

what I would give you for a kiss.

***

Por una mirada, un mundo;

por una sonrisa, un cielo;

por un beso… ¡Yo no sé

qué te diera por un beso!

***

The original Spanish is from Gustavo Adolpho Bécquer. As always, any errors in the English translation are entirely my own.

Rima XXI (translation) – G. A. Bécquer

What is poetry? you ask

as your blue eyes stare into mine.

What is poetry?  And you ask this of me?

Poetry…is you.

***

¿Qué es poesía?, dices, mientras clavas

en mi pupila tu pupila azul,

¡Qué es poesía! ¿Y tú me lo preguntas?

Poesía… eres tú.

***

The original lovely words are from Gustavo Adolpho Bécquer. Any errors in translation are entirely my own…

Rima XVII (translation) – G. A. Bécquer

Today the earth and the heavens smile at me;

today the sun reaches the depths of my soul;

today I have seen her… I have seen her and she has looked on me…

Today I believe in God!

***

Hoy la tierra y los cielos me sonríen,

hoy llega al fondo de mi alma el sol,

hoy la he visto… La he visto y me ha mirado…

¡Hoy creo en Dios!

***

I thought it might be fun to share translations on occasion. Many years ago when I was studying Spanish, I translated a few of Gustavo Adolpho Bécquer’s Rimas (Rhymes, or Poems). Beautiful lyrical language.